Is it the end of the road for this Liverpool defender?

By on October 29, 2012

A whole-hearted red – despite his Everton roots as a child – Jamie Carragher is the ultimate one-club man: Mr Liverpool.

Forever alongside Steven Gerrard as Liverpool’s ‘go to men’, the duo have represented the red side of Merseyside with myriad devotion and ardour; but the end is looming. Gerrard’s captaincy may just propel him on for a few more seasons, although its Carra’s career that looks to be reaching an unsavoury diminuendo.

Having played under more managers than he has scored goals for Liverpool, you start to contemplate how much more is left in the grand old legs of Jamie Carragher. Next month sees Carra reach his 16th year of being a red and, unfortunately, it looks year number 17 is just out of his grasp but, since his Liverpool inauguration in October 1996, Carra’s 705 outings for the Reds have exemplified himself, the city and pertinently, the club: spirited, resolute and assiduous.

The Rodgers era’s zephyr has swept through Anfield, enclosing flurries of a new continental approach, a new philosophy, a new Liverpool; though an Anfield veteran of six managers, you query Carragher’s ability to integrate into this new slant with as much gusto and diligence as he has the rest.

His rugged and no nonsense defending seems inapt in Brendan Rodgers’ convalescing tiki-taka style, more or less rendering Jamie inadequate when measured up to the likes of Daniel Agger and Martin Skrtel who seem to be the inclined duo centre back, and in a world where stylish defending is of the essence, Carra becomes a square peg in a round hole. As much as his traditional defending manner seems unsuited to Rodgers’ possession approach, Carra has 16 years of first class football behind him – a wealth of experience to invoke to try and acclimatize.

With trepidation though, I believe Carragher’s days are well and truly numbered. It’s sad. It’s almost painful to read the Liverpool team sheet every week; virtually anticipating the dearth of our faithful servant in the starting XI.

Nevertheless, there may well be more Liverpool left in Jamie Carragher – management.

Perched on the bench for many a time thus far under Rodgers, observing the Irishman’s conduct could do Carra a remarkable amount of good. His philosophy offers an illustration of where modern football is going and should Carragher delve into the world of coaching in the future, Rodgers would present a great insight into life as a young coach.

So, as Carragher’s iridescent footballing candle starts to douse, it’s time to call a spade a spade. Carragher’s vigorous Liverpool journey is reaching a humble finale but we won’t be without our doting memories.

Nonetheless, from the quenched embers, could come a bespoke leader – one filled with immense pride, overflowing with footballing astuteness and incredible prosperity. One ready to pilot his treasured club and its adoring fans back to where they dearly belong. One ready to paradigm the youth as he has with great dignity for many years.

Liverpool fans, give us your thoughts – is Carragher finished at Liverpool? Will he go into management? Comment below!

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3 Comments

  1. ian

    October 30, 2012 at 4:07 am

    he,s been offered a new 2 year deal? so dont know what your talking about…granted he might not play..

  2. Clyde

    October 30, 2012 at 6:59 am

    The least said about the tactically- and technically-inept Jamie Hoofer Carragher the better. One wonders why he chose to play professional football when he is so frigging uncomfortable with a football at his feet.

  3. Matthew Wood

    October 30, 2012 at 8:51 am

    Nobody should ever forget what an unbelievable player Jamie Carragher has been for Liverpool.

    During his prime, there weren’t many better defenders in Europe. Unfortunately, age has caught up with him now.

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